Lukas Janssen - Technische Universität Dresden

Low Temperature Physics (TT), Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (MP)

Position Emmy Noether Junior Research Group Leader
e-mail
Address Institut für Theoretische Physik Technische Universität Dresden 01062 Dresden
Germany
Research Condensed Matter Physics, Strongly-Correlated Electrons, Frustrated Magnetism, Quantum Phase Transitions
Weblinks Group-Website 
Publication List
Divisions Low Temperature Physics (TT)
Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (MP)

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janssen-board-2.jpg
© Lukas Janssen

Research Agenda: We investigate a variety of strongly-correlated condensed-matter systems from the common viewpoint of quantum criticality. This includes models for frustrated magnets and interacting semimetals, as well as quantum critical systems that are described by emergent gauge field theories. What are the characteristic excitations? What are the relevant interactions? What is the nature of a quantum critical point and its adjacent phases? How can a material be tuned through a quantum critical point into a regime that stabilizes a novel quantum phase? Methodologically and conceptually we benefit from recent symbiotic developments in condensed matter, high-energy, and statistical physics, and we intend to also further advance these emergent bridges between different subfields of physics.

Short Bio: With a dissertation on strongly-interacting field theories, I graduated in the group of Holger Gies at the University of Jena (Germany). Working with Igor Herbut at Simon Fraser University (Canada) and Matthias Vojta at TU Dresden (Germany) as a postdoc, I learned to apply my field-theoretical expertise to condensed-matter systems. Since 2019 I lead an Emmy Noether Junior Research Group at TU Dresden, dedicated to "Quantum Critical Matter". I am also an Associate Member of the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence on "Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter" and a Principal Investigator of the Collaborative Research Center 1143 on "Correlated Magnetism: From Frustration to Topology".