Physikerin der Woche 2020

Since January 2018 we highlight each week one woman in physics who works in Germany or one German woman in physics who works abroad.

Please contact Dr. Ulrike Boehm if you would like to participate or if you would like to suggest a suitable candidate. We reported about our initiative in the April issue of the Physikjournal in 2018. The German article can be found here.

Participants of previous years can be found here: 2018 and 2019.

Februar

Prof. Dr. Laura Na Liu (Heidelberg) - Kalenderwoche 8

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Laura is a Professor at the Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics at the Heidelberg University. She works at the interface between nanophotonics, biology, and chemistry. Her group focuses on developing sophisticated and smart optical nanosystems for answering structural biology questions as well as catalytic chemistry questions in local environments.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Laura Na Liu

 

 

Prof. Dr. Claudia Eberlein (Loughborough, UK) - Kalenderwoche 7

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Claudia is a Professor of Theoretical Physics and Dean of the School of Science at Loughborough University. Her research involves the application of quantum field theory to nanotechnology. Charged or polarizable quantum systems interact with the quantized electromagnetic field which leads to quantum corrections, e.g. the Lamb shift in atoms or the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. This interaction is affected by the presence of material boundaries that reflect, refract, or absorb light, and this causes spatial variations in these quantum corrections that can be exploited for nanotechnology. However, after three decades of research in this field, Claudia now spends most of her time leading the School of Science, which comprises 5 academic disciplines and includes 240 staff and 2200 students, and contributing to the leadership and management of Loughborough University.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Claudia Eberlein

 

 

 

Dr. Almut Beige (Leeds, UK) - Kalenderwoche 6

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Almut is the Head of the Theoretical Physics group at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom. Since completing her PhD at the University of Goettingen, Almut has been fascinated with the often very strange implications of quantum physics. Already in 2000, she used such implications to design more efficient quantum computing schemes in open quantum systems. Some of her ideas are currently implemented in labs worldwide. Recently, Almut's groups became fascinated by quantum photonics and tries to better understand different ways of seeing light.

 

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Almut Beige

Januar

Dr. Elisa Palacino González (Berlin) - Kalenderwoche 5

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Elisa Palacino González holds a doctoral degree from the Technical University of Munich in the area of Theoretical Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of molecules. One of the main goals in her PhD work was the development of methods for the simulation and interpretation of nonlinear optical spectroscopic signals in the UV region, as an approach to understand the ultrafast nuclear dynamics of nontrivial model systems. Now she is working as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Max Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short-Pulse Spectroscopy in Berlin, where she is focused on the combined application of ab initio calculations and QM/MM methods with the simulation of nonlinear optical IR spectra to explain the mechanisms behind the photoinduced dynamics of molecules in solvated environments.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Elisa Palacino González

Prof. Dr. Daniela Rupp (Zürich) - Kalenderwoche 4

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Daniela and her group at ETH Zurich investigate the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles. Using intense X-ray flashes, they take snapshots of individual nanoparticles in free flight by light scattering – this is called coherent diffraction imaging. For their experiments, they either travel to huge X-ray free-electron lasers or use high-intensity laboratory lasers to generate short-wave light pulses. With coherent diffraction imaging, it has become possible to investigate the structure of fragile nanostructures that cannot be deposited and introduced into an electron microscope. In addition, the ultra-short pulses allow for obtaining movies of extremely fast dynamics in these small particles. The investigations help gaining new insights into the processes leading to structure formation and developing a better understanding and control of the interaction of intense X-ray pulses with matter. 

Foto-Rechte: Jakob Jordan

Hier geht es zu den Teilnehmerinnen der Physikerin der Woche 2018 und 2019 Projekte.