Physikerin der Woche 2021

Since January 2018, the working group on equal opportunities (AKC) highlights/celebrates women in physics in Germany or German women in physics abroad every week.

Are you a woman in physics in Germany or a German woman in physics abroad, and would you like to highlight your field of research within the "Physikerin der Woche" initiative? If so, please contact Dr. Ulrike Boehm .

Women in physics of all career stages can participate (bachelor students, master students, postdocs, group leaders, professors).

Alternatively, please feel free to suggest suitable candidates. 

You can find an article and a poster about our initiative in the April 2018 and February 2021 issues of the Physik-Journal. Please feel free to print the poster and advertise our initiative at your research institution. 

Participants of previous years can be found here: 20182019, and 2020.

Juni

Prof. Dr. Roser Valentí (Frankfurt) - Kalenderwoche 25

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Roser is a professor of theoretical physics at the Goethe University Frankfurt. Her field of research is computational solid-state with a focus on microscopic modeling of correlated materials such as unconventional superconductors, frustrated magnets, and systems with topologically non-trivial states via a combination of first-principles-based methods and many-body numerical techniques.
 
 
 

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Roser Valentí

M.Sc. Lara Ortmanns (Gothenburg, Sweden) - Kalenderwoche 24

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Lara is a Ph.D. student within a co-tutoring agreement between the RWTH Aachen and Chalmers University in Sweden, which will lead to a jointly awarded degree. At RWTH Aachen, she works at the Department of Theory for Statistical Physics and is part of the Research Training Group "Quantum Many-Body Methods in Condensed-Matter Systems"; at Chalmers University, she works at the Applied Quantum Physics Laboratory of the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience. Her current work focuses on out-of-equilibrium dissipative quantum systems with strong Coulomb interaction. In particular, she is interested in their transient dynamics that are manifest in charge and heat transport. In the future, she will also consider aspects of quantum thermodynamics in this kind of quantum system.
 

Foto-Rechte: M.Sc. Lara Ortmanns

M.Sc. Anne Emering (Dortmund) - Kalenderwoche 23

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Anne recently finished her Master's degree at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). During her Master's thesis, she analyzed different effects of doping on the charge carrier dynamics in organic semiconductors. As of now, she started her Ph.D. in the research group of Prof. Götz Uhrig at TU Dortmund, where she aims to investigate topological excitations in magnetic systems theoretically.
 
 
 
 

Foto-Rechte: M.Sc. Anne Emering

Mai

Dr. Yulia Krupskaya (Dresden) - Kalenderwoche 22

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Yulia is a group leader at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden. Her group is working on organic and metal-organic materials investigating molecular single crystal growth, structural, charge transport, and magnetic properties. One of the main focuses of the group is organic semiconductor single crystals, which, thanks to their perfect structure, enable investigation and understanding of fundamental electronic properties such as charge transfer and transport - the most relevant effects for organic electronics applications.
 
 

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Yulia Krupskaya

M.Sc. Marie Schmitz (Dortmund) - Kalenderwoche 21

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Marie is a Ph.D. student at TU Dortmund University. She works at the department of experimental solid-state physics 1b. Her research addresses the metal-semiconductor interface of low-dimensional, silicon-based nanostructures. In order to understand their chemical and structural properties, photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron diffraction experiments are conducted. The experiments are performed with soft x-rays from beamline 11 of the Dortmund storage ring DELTA. In combination with theoretical simulations, she reveals detailed structure models at the atomic scale. Besides her work, she is actively involved in the association for physics students and alumni to expand the network between active and former physics students.

Foto-Rechte: M.Sc. Marie Schmitz

Dr. Ivy Frenger (Kiel) - Kalenderwoche 20

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Ivy is a research scientist at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and presently involved in the BMBF project Humboldt Tipping. Her research focus is on the role of ocean mesoscale eddies in the Earth system. Mesoscale eddies are circular currents in the ocean with typical lateral scales of around 100 kilometers and lifetimes of about a month, and they are ephemeral phenomena in the ocean. Ivy makes use of numerical ocean models to test the impact of mesoscale eddies for instance on how the ocean stores carbon, which is fundamental to understand in the context of anthropogenic climate change.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Ivy Frenger

Dr. Isabella Graf (New Haven, CT, USA) - Kalenderwoche 19

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Isabella is a postdoctoral researcher in theoretical biophysics working with Ben Machta at Yale University. Her goal is to better understand how biological systems self-organize themselves to be close to critical points, where they can exhibit collective behaviors and high sensitivity to small external signals. She has a particular focus on multicomponent mixtures like cellular membranes. Experiments with cell-derived plasma membranes suggest that their composition resides near a miscibility critical point. However, there have been few hints as to how this regulation occurs and Isabella is working to understand whether lipid homeostasis motifs could naturally tune the membrane to these interesting regions of thermodynamic space.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Isabella Graf

Dr. Beata M. Szydłowska (Neubiberg/Munich) - Kalenderwoche 18

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Beata is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Physics at the Bundeswehr University Munich in Neubiberg. Her work spins around 2D materials, e.g., graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, especially WS2 and PtSe2. These materials are layered structures that are uniquely defined as they dramatically change their properties while thinned down to monolayer. Beata is interested in their fundamental size-dependent properties but also possible applications. Recently, she explores their pollutants sensing capabilities. It is an extremely important problem as about 4.2 million deaths are caused by pollutions annually. 

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Beata M. Szydłowska

April

Dr. Manita Chouksey (Hamburg) - Kalenderwoche 17

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Manita is a post-doctoral researcher in Theoretical Oceanography at the Institut für Meereskunde, Universität Hamburg. Her research explores the energy transfers and nonlinear interactions between internal gravity waves and mesoscale eddies in geophysical flows. Her research ranges from developing mathematical equations and numerical computational methods in order to disentangle the balanced eddy motions from the unbalanced wave motions to running numerical model simulations to understand energy transfers between these motions as well as nonlinear wave-wave interactions. These processes form an important component of the energy cycle of Earth's atmosphere and ocean.

Her recent venture is combining the theory and observations using numerical models of oceanic processes to understand the role of eddies and waves on the eastern boundary upwelling systems through process modeling within the project REEBUS.

Beyond a scientist, Manita is an artist, a poet, an amateur astronomer and has acted in theater plays, one of which has been showcased in an intercultural festival in Hamburg.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Manita Chouksey

Prof. Dr. Christine Selhuber-Unkel (Heidelberg) - Kalenderwoche 16

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She works with her group at the interface of biophysics and materials science, where they control cells by embedding them into 3D structures or applying forces to them. The goal of their research is to investigate novel concepts for tissue engineering and biohybrid robotics. 
 
 
 
 

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Christine Selhuber-Unkel

M.Sc. Anni Röse (Braunschweig) - Kalenderwoche 15

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Anni studied physics in Göttingen, Germany. She received her M.S. degree from the Georg-August University in 2018. Since 2019, she has been pursuing a Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering at the Ilmenau University of Technology and is a part of working group 5.42 “Multiwavelength interferometry for geodetic lengths” at PTB.
One critical issue when surveying large structures like telescopes outdoors is the compensation of the refractivity-induced beam bending in leveling. For this, the temperature gradients in the plane along the line of sight need to be determined. She and her colleagues are currently developing a dispersive optical thermometer. It will be realized by an absolute interferometer with two different colors and a 2f/3f detection scheme for phase detection.

Foto-Rechte: M.Sc. Anni Röse

Dr. Jenny Wagner (Heidelberg) - Kalenderwoche 14

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Jenny is a cosmologist of the Institute for Theoretical Physics at Heidelberg University. In her own DFG-funded research project, she explores dark matter distributions and properties that can be directly inferred from observed strong gravitational lensing effects. These rare phenomena occur when light rays of background light sources bend around massive objects on their path into our telescopes, such that observations of these deflections allow inferring properties of the light-bending mass. In December 2020, she was awarded the Prize for Courageous Science for her innovative approach to separate observation-based evidence from model assumptions. Currently, she transfers this methodology to derive the morphologies of dark matter agglomerations from fundamental principles to replace heuristic fitting functions like the Navarro-Frenk-White mass density profile, which is often used to describe deflecting masses in strong gravitational lensing. Beyond her research, she engages in outreach talks for "Urknall, Weltall und das Leben" to disseminate recent insights into our universe to the public.

Foto-Rechte: Björn Pucks

März

B.Sc. Maren Stocklöw (Karlsruhe) - Kalenderwoche 13

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Maren Stocklöw is a master's student at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Currently, she is working on her master's thesis in the group of Prof. Markus Garst at the Institute of Theoretical Solid State Physics. She is investigating the effective low-energy behavior of Skyrmion strings in chiral magnets. Skyrmions are two-dimensional topological magnetic structures that appear in chiral magnets subjected to an external magnetic field. They can extend along the field direction, forming a magnetic string that supports the propagation of spin-wave excitations. Alongside her studies, Maren is chairwoman of the physics department’s theater group. Since its formation in 2002, the group has staged more than 25 plays in the physics lecture hall.

Foto-Rechte: B.Sc. Maren Stocklöw

Jun.-Prof. Dr. Doris Reiter (Münster) - Kalenderwoche 12

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Doris is a Junior-Professor at the University of Münster leading the research group Ultrafast Optics in Nanostructured Solids. Her research field is solid-state theory with a focus on light-matter interaction on ultra-short time and length scales. Furthermore, she is highly interested in solid-state applications for quantum information technology. Since 2017, Doris is co-speaker of the Semiconductor Division of the DPG and host of ‘Semiconductors for breakfast’ – a new online lecture format of the DPG. Moreover, Doris is chairperson and co-founder of the DPG working groups AGyouLeaP, aiming at increasing the standing and visibility of young research group leaders in physics who start their own research agenda.

Foto-Rechte: Jun.-Prof. Dr. Doris Reiter

Dr. Heike Wex (Leipzig) - Kalenderwoche 11

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Heike is a senior scientist at the Leibniz-Institute for Tropospheric Research in Leipzig. She is a renowned expert in topics concerning cloud condensation nuclei and heterogeneous ice nucleation and currently focuses on atmospheric ice-nucleating particles. She is a member of the International Commission on Clouds and Precipitation, for which she also organized the 16th ICCP-conference in Leipzig in 2012. Through classes in geology and meteorology, which she took during her physics studies, she started to know about climate change, and particularly through working with data from the Arctic, she is very aware of the connected dangers for humanity. This is why, in her spare time, she is engaged with “Scientists for Future” since their beginning in March 2019, trying to inform people about climate change in general and also trying to change things for the better on a local scale, in cooperation with many other locals who also organize themselves in several climate groups.

The picture shows her on the top level of LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) at the cloud-tower of the Leibniz-Institute for Tropospheric Research in Leipzig, at the generation unit for aerosol particles. LACIS is used to examine the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles and their ability to nucleate cloud droplets and heterogeneous droplet freezing.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Heike Wex

Dr. Benedetta Casu (Tübingen) - Kalenderwoche 10

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Benedetta is head of the Organic Spins group at the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Tübingen. She works in the field of organic quantum materials.

She pioneered the research on radical thin films introducing the use of soft X-rays-based techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoemission electron microscopy with the additional use of synchrotron radiation that is of paramount importance to elucidate interface phenomena otherwise not accessible with other sources. The thin-film phase of organic radicals and their interfaces were unknown before she started working in the field. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to test their suitability for electronics.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Benedetta Casu

Dr. Anne Nielsen (Dresden) - Kalenderwoche 9

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Anne leads the Quantum Many-Body Systems group at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems. Her group uses numerical simulations and analytical tools to study the properties of strongly-correlated quantum systems in one, two, and fractal dimensions. She is particularly interested in anyonic quasiparticles that appear in topological quantum systems. She also studies exceptions to thermal behavior and how measurements affect the dynamics of quantum systems. The aim is to find new types of behaviors and to understand how and when particular properties arise.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Anne Nielsen

Februar

Prof. Dr. Julia Dshemuchadse (Ithaca, NY, USA) - Kalenderwoche 8

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Julia is an assistant professor at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY in the USA. With her research group, she studies complex crystal structures as well as crystallization phenomena through self-assembly simulations, using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods. Their goal is to design new materials and to develop a fundamental understanding of the processes of structure formation and stabilization in soft and hard condensed matter.

 

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Julia Dshemuchadse

Dr. Angela Wittmann (Cambridge, MA, USA) - Kalenderwoche 7

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Angela is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA) in the group of Prof. Geoffrey Beach. Her research explores the control of the spin degree of freedom and spin dynamics in unconventional condensed matter materials such as organic semiconductors and antiferromagnets. Using different experimental techniques, including magneto-transport measurements and x-ray imaging, she aims to tackle the challenges posed by today’s vast amount of data by developing novel ultrafast and robust spin-based memory technologies.

 

 

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Angela Wittmann

M.Sc. Martha Lippich (Garching/Munich) - Kalenderwoche 6

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Martha is currently finishing her Ph.D. in the field of cosmology with a focus on the statistical analysis of the large-scale structure in the Universe. For her latest Ph.D. project, she developed a code to estimate Minkowski functionals from the large-scale galaxy distribution under the supervision of Dr. Ariel G. Sánchez. Minkowski functionals characterize the geometry and the topology of the cosmic density field and contain important cosmological information. She currently works in the OPINAS group of Prof. Ralf Bender at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching. After her Ph.D., she intends to continue her work in the same group as a postdoctoral researcher. Her goal is to advance the analysis of Minkowski functionals further to extract information complementary to other more standard statistical analyses.

Foto-Rechte: M.Sc. Martha Lippich

M.Sc. Anna Sinterhauf (Göttingen) - Kalenderwoche 5

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Anna is a Ph.D. student at the IV. Physical Institute at the University of Göttingen. She is working in the group of Martin Wenderoth, which focuses on the development and application of scanning probe methods with the aim of answering challenging questions in the field of fundamental research on solid-state physics and nanostructures. In her experiments, Anna studies charge transport in graphene on the nanometer scale. The focus of her research is on understanding the impact of atomic-scale inhomogeneities on transport properties in this fascinating 2D material. To target this question, Anna uses the method of scanning tunneling potentiometry, which allows her to measure the voltage drop across a sample with the lateral resolution of a scanning tunneling microscope. The measurements take place under ultra-high vacuum conditions and are carried out both at room temperature and at low temperature using liquid nitrogen / liquid helium cooling. The picture shows Anna next to one of the home-built scanning tunneling microscopes.

Foto-Rechte: M.Sc. Anna Sinterhauf

Januar

Dr. Eileen Otte (Muenster) - Kalenderwoche 4

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Eileen is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Applied Physics, University of Muenster. Her research focuses on structured singular light fields, representing light of spatially varying properties as amplitude, phase, and/or polarization and embedding optical singularities. Eileen develops novel approaches for the customization, analysis, and application of these complex light fields, giving new insights into the fundamental nature of light and paving the way to, for instance, advanced quantum communication or optical micro- and nano-manipulation. For her excellent Ph.D. thesis, she received the University of Muenster dissertation award and the research award 2020 of the Industrial Club Duesseldorf. Since the beginning of this year, Eileen is a junior class member of the North Rhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Eileen Otte

Dr. Anja Waske (Berlin) - Kalenderwoche 3

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Anja is head of the division "Radiological Methods" at the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) in Berlin. Her research field is at the interface of materials science and X-ray imaging. Her team develops 3D X-ray imaging methods and analysis routes for 3D image data in order to understand the properties of functional, structural, and additively manufactured materials.

Anja has been awarded the Georg-Sachs Prize of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Materialkunde e.V. (DGM) in 2020. 

Foto-Rechte: BAM

Prof. Dr. Franziska Lautenschläger (Saarbrücken) - Kalenderwoche 2

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Franziska leads an interdisciplinary workgroup in cellular biophysics at the University of Saarland, Germany. Her group works on the cytoskeleton in living cells: They are imaging actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments and manipulate them with laser light to understand their polymerization dynamics, interplay, and impact on mechanical properties of the cell. They are also interested in the effect the cytoskeleton has on cellular functions, particularly cellular migration capacity, search efficiency, or cells' ability to polarize. Understanding these basic concepts in biophysics helps them understand how cells function in healthy organisms and potentially treat them in diseases.

Foto-Rechte: Iris Maurer - Silbersalz

Dr. Katrin Fuersich (Stuttgart) - Kalenderwoche 1

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Katrin is currently working at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany. She graduated in November 2020 with a Ph.D. work on the spectroscopic investigation of so-called quantum materials and keeps investigating these fascinating class of materials as a postdoctoral scholar. Using x-ray-based scattering methods, Katrin explores the unprecedented properties of Ni- and Ru-based quantum materials for potential applications, such as next-generation electronics or novel devices for energy storage and conversion.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Katrin Fuersich

 

Hier geht es zu den Teilnehmerinnen der Physikerin der Woche 20182019 und 2020 Projekte.