Physikerin der Woche 2019

Seit Januar 2018 stellen wir Ihnen wöchentlich eine Physikerin in einem kurzen Bericht vor.

Möchten Sie selbst Ihr Forschungsgebiet vorstellen oder wollen Sie eine Physikerin in Deutschland oder eine deutsche Physikerin im Ausland (Bachelorstudentin, Masterstudentin, Doktorandin, Postdoktorandin, Gruppenleiterin, Professorin - Physikerinnen aller Karrierestufen können sich beteiligen) für unser Physikerin der Woche Projekt vorschlagen, dann kontaktieren Sie bitte Frau Dr. Ulrike Boehm . Einen Artikel über unsere Aktion in der Aprilausgabe 2018 des Physik-Journals finden Sie hier.

Im letzten Jahr haben wir 52 Physikerinnen hervorgehoben. Auch in diesem Jahr setzen wir unser Projekt fort. Alle 52 Teilnehmerinnen aus 2018 finden sie hier!

In diesem Jahr werden wir neben Physikerinnen an Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen, auch Physikerinnen aus der Industrie vorstellen.  

März

Prof. Dr. Sarah Hallerberg (Hamburg) - Kalenderwoche 13

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Sarah is a professor for applied mathematics and computational science at Hamburg University of Applied Science although she is a theoretical physicist by training. Her research interests are data mining, nonlinear dynamics, time series-analysis, machine-learning and predictions of extreme events.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Sarah Hallerberg

Prof. Dr. Anna Frebel (Cambridge, MA) - Kalenderwoche 12

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Anna is an Associate Professor of Physics at the MIT in Cambridge, MA. She searches for the oldest star in the universe. Chemical elements are made in stars, supernova explosions and merging neutron stars and then ejected into the surrounding gas. In the early universe, the oldest stars formed from gas enriched in just hydrogen and helium. Since these stars preserve the element signatures from their birth gas cloud until the present, they can study the origin of the elements produced 13 billion years ago. They use the largest telescopes, such as the 6.5 m Magellan telescope in Chile for this work. Their discovery and results are described in her popular science book Searching for the Oldest Stars - Ancient Relics of the Early Universe.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Anna Frebel

Prof. Dr. Manuela Schiek (Oldenburg) - Kalenderwoche 11

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Manuela holds a Junior-Professorship at the University of Oldenburg and is leading the “Opto-Electronic Organics” team. She explores structure correlated excitonic phenomena in organic semiconductors with special curiosity for excitonic circular dichroism and spin-polarization. Since such chirality routed properties are hallmarks of the living world, she works at the functional interfaces between light, life and nanoscopic soft matter. Outreaching from fundamentals to applications she develops circular polarized photosensor and photovoltaic neuro-stimulating platforms.

The snapshot shows Manuela working at one of her favorite optical tools, a spectroscopic ellipsometer, to study the dielectric properties and polarized optics of thin films.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Manuela Schiek

Prof. Dr. Ilaria Testa (Stockholm) - Kalenderwoche 10

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Ilaria is the head of the group "Advanced Optical Bio-Imaging Laboratory" in the Science for Life Laboratory, a joint institution between KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and other Swedish universities. By understanding how fluorescence molecules can be used as light switcher, she develops new microscopy approaches, which can image faster and gentler. This is exciting because it allows to study small structures previously inaccessible such as the protein machinery of the synapse and its rapid dynamics directly in living and functioning nerve cells. 

In 2014 she received a starting grant from the European Research Council.

The photo shows Ilaria (center) and her group in her laboratory in Stockholm.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Ilaria Testa

Februar

Dr. Daniela Doneva (Tübingen) - Kalenderwoche 9

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Daniela is a postdoc at the University of Tübingen and she is about to start leading an Emmy Noether junior research group on “Gravitational waves from compact objects – a tool for testing strong gravity and nuclear matter at extreme densities”. Her studies are concentrated on the most compact objects known to exist in the
Universe – neutron stars and black holes. These objects are ideal laboratories to test our understanding of physics at the most extreme regimes of dense matter and strong gravity. The recent direct detections of gravitational waves from merging black holes and neutron stars, that was one of the most significant breakthroughs in physics in the last decades, makes the subject of Daniela’s studies even more timely and fascinating.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Daniela Doneva

Dr. Anne Schukraft (Batavia/Chicago) - Kalenderwoche 8

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Anne is a neutrino physicist working at Fermilab, which is a particle accelerator laboratory by Chicago. At Fermilab, they produce high-energy neutrino beams with the proton accelerator complex in order to study the properties of neutrinos in neutrino oscillation experiments. Neutrinos are challenging to detect and they are developing the technology of large time projection chambers filled with liquid Argon, which they ultimately want to scale to 10-Kiloton size detector modules for the future Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) that will be located in a mine 1.5 km under the surface in South Dakota.
 
She was awarded with the Hertha Sponer Prize 2014 of the German Physical Society for her doctoral dissertation, which provides a better understanding of sources of systematic error and helps to achieve improved experimental sensitivity of the IceCube neutrino observatory.
Foto-Rechte: Fermilab

Prof. Dr. Lavinia Heisenberg (Zürich) - Kalenderwoche 7

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Lavinia is an Assistant Professor of Theoretical Cosmology at the ETH Zürich in Switzerland. It is her aim to explore further the interplay between particle physics and cosmology as well as studying how to use astrophysical and cosmological probes to test generalizations of gravity theory beyond General Relativity. On the theory side, the quest for a consistent theory of quantum gravity and the signatures of generalized gravity theories strongly attracts her attention. On the more observational side, she is especially interested in the dynamics of cosmic structure formation and in experiments that map the cosmological large-scale structure and trace out its evolution. In addition, the recent detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO team has paved an exciting new avenue for testing gravitational theories. These new observations will put even more stringent constraints on generalized gravity theories.

Foto-Rechte: Prof. Dr. Lavinia Heisenberg

Dr. Kira Rehfeld (Heidelberg) - Kalenderwoche 6

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Kira leads the Emmy-Noether group STACY - State and timescale dependency of climate variability from the last Glacial to present day - at Heidelberg University. To understand changes in past climate dynamics her group's research combines coupled climate model experiments, models of the climate recording processes of ice cores, speleothems and pollen, with complex systems approaches. She particularly focuses on assessing climate model abilities for simulating climate variability beyond the centennial timescale, which cannot be evaluated based on instrumental observations, and on testing which roles linear vs. nonlinear processes play in creating the continuous spectrum of climate.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Kira Rehfeld

Januar

Dr. Susanne Liese (Oslo/Norway) - Kalenderwoche 5

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Susanne is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Mathematics at the University of Oslo, Norway. In her work, she uses mathematical and numerical modeling to study questions at the intersection between physics, biology and chemistry. The scientific subjects she is particularly interested in, include multivalent ligand-receptor binding as well as vesicle formation in elastic bio-membranes.

She received the Ernst-Reuter-Award for her outstanding PhD thesis at the Freie Universität in Berlin.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Susanne Liese

Dr. Friederike Wrobel (Lemont/Chicago) - Kalenderwoche 4

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Friederike is a postdoctoral researcher at Argonne National Laboratory close to Chicago, USA. Her goal is to understand why some materials are conducting electricity and others don't, why some are magnetic and others aren't. While this question is relatively easy to answer for conventional materials where electrons don't care much about each other, it is not well understood for correlated materials where electrons strongly interact with each other. Through stacking individual atomic layers on top of each other, Friederike creates novel and very well controlled materials that allow her to study the way electrons "talk" to each other. She also just started her term as president of the Postdoctoral Society of Argonne, representing and advocating for her fellow postdocs.

The opinions Friederike expresses are her own and do not necessarily reflect those of Argonne or its management.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Friederike Wrobel

Jun.-Prof. Heike Kalesse (Leipzig) - Kalenderwoche 3

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Junior-Professor Heike Kalesse is leading the working group “Remote Sensing and the Arctic System” at the Leipzig Institute for Meteorology (LIM) at Leipzig University. Her research focuses on combining ground-based remote sensing instruments to get comprehensive profile information on temperature, clouds, precipitation, and wind. She uses these observations to develop atmospheric retrieval algorithms. She loves clouds and field-work and will be participating in atmospheric field experiments around the globe, for example in Southern Chile, the Caribbean, and the Arctic Ocean. She finds sharing her knowledge on clouds and climate with the general public and especially children very important. 

Heike Kalesse with the OCEANET-Container remote-sensing instrument suite onboard the RV Polarstern on the Atlantic Ocean in December 2016.

Foto-Rechte: Moritz Haarig

Dr. Karin Everschor-Sitte (Mainz) - Kalenderwoche 2

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Karin is the head of the Emmy-Noether group TWIST – Topological Whirls in SpinTronics at the University of Mainz. Within the TWIST Group they investigate the complex fundamental physics of topologically protected magnetic structures — skyrmions. In particular, they study the interplay between skyrmions, different magnetic structures, and spin and charge currents. This interplay is governed by microscopic mechanisms within complex materials that must also be understood and engineered. Gaining a deeper understanding of these mechanisms to optimally utilize the properties of skyrmions towards potential spintronics applications is a key focus of their work. Karin was awarded with the Hertha Sponer Prize 2018 of the German Physical Society.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Angelika Stele

Dr. Eva Benckiser (Stuttgart) - Kalenderwoche 1

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Eva is a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany. Her research focuses on the study of strongly correlated transition-metal oxide heterostructures. These materials show many technologically interesting phases, such as high-temperature superconductivity or multiferroicity. In bulk form, however, these phases are often difficult to access. The goal of Eva's research is to gain fundamental understanding of heteroepitaxy-induced spin, charge, orbital, and lattice reconstructions, ultimately enabling a targeted design of new functional materials for future electronic devices. Recently, she was awarded with the Walter Schottky Prize 2019 of the German Physical Society.

Foto-Rechte: Dr. Eva Benckiser

 

Hier geht es zu den Teilnehmerinnen des Physikerin der Woche 2018 Projektes