/Error 404: Social Life Not Found/ – How to bring politics back into the datafied society

Physik und Gesellschaft (Vortrag in englischer Sprache)

Lecture
Date:
Tu, 09.04.2019 18:30  –   Tu, 09.04.2019 20:00
Sprecher:
Prof. Stefania Milan, Department of Media Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Adresse:
Magnus-Haus Berlin
Am Kupfergraben 7, 10117 Berlin, Germany

 
Registration required
Language:
English
Contact person:
Andreas Böttcher,

Description

Stefania Milan (stefaniamilan.net) is Associate Professor of New Media at the University of Amsterdam. Her work explores the intersection of digital technology, governance and activism, with emphasis on critical data practices and autonomous infrastructure. Stefania is the Principal Investigator of the DATACTIVE project, funded with a Starting Grant of the European Research Council (639379) and exploring the evolution of citizenship and participation vis-à-vis datafication and surveillance (data-activism.net), and of the spin-off ALEX project (ERC Proof of Concept 825974). She is the author of Social Movements and Their Technologies: Wiring Social Change (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013/2016) and co-author of Media/Society (Sage, 2011).

Datafication – or the process of rendering into data aspects of social life that have never been quantified before – has altered the way we experience ourselves and exercise our citizenship today. Blanket surveillance and privacy infringements, however, are making citizens grow aware of the critical role of information as the new fabric of social life. As the advent of datafication and the automation turn threaten social life as we know it, how can we re-invent citizenship? How can we bring progressive politics back, to inform, among others, technological development and public policies? In this talk I will reflect on how politics and citizen agency are re-designed in light of the challenges and possibilities of big data and machine learning.

Diskussionsleitung: Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Eberhardt, Wiss. Leiter Magnus-Haus Berlin

Diese Veranstaltung wird gefördert durch die Wilhelm und Else Heraeus-Stiftung.